Ireland: Recommended vaccinations
  General recommendation
  Recommendation for specific groups only
  Catch-up (e.g. if previous doses missed)
 
Vaccination not funded by the National Health system
 
Mandatory vaccination
MonthsYears
2461213245121315-174564≥ 65
Coronavirus disease (COVID-19)1
COVID-191
rotavirus infection
ROTA
ROTA
diphtheria
D
D
D
D
d4
d5
tetanus
TT
TT
TT
TT
TT
TT
pertussis
acP
acP
acP
acP
acp4
acp5
poliomyelitis
IPV
IPV
IPV
IPV
Haemophilus influenzae type b infection
Hib
Hib
Hib
Hib6
hepatitis B
HepB
HepB
HepB
pneumococcal disease2
PCV
PCV
PCV
PPSV237
meningococcal disease3
MenB
MenB
MenC
MenB
MenC6
MCV4
measles
MEAS
MEAS
mumps
MUMPS
MUMPS
rubella
RUBE
RUBE
human papillomavirus infection
HPV (F/M)8
influenza
IIV4/LAIV9
IIV410
IIV47

Version:


Footnotes:

  1. https://www.hse.ie/eng/health/immunisation/hcpinfo/covid19vaccineinfo4hps/
  2. Those with high risk conditions (as outlined in national guidance) from 24 months of age are recommended PCV and PPSV23. PPSV23 should be given at least two months after the PCV dose. A second dose of PPV23 may be indicated for some, at least 5 years after first dose.
  3. For a full description of meningococcal C national guidance and vaccination policy, please refer to the corresponding chapter at http://www.hse.ie/eng/health/immunisation/hcpinfo/guidelines/
  4. Booster dose
  5. Tdap - Vaccination for pregnant women between 16-36 weeks gestation.
  6. Hib/MenC combined vaccine
  7. The vaccine is free of charge, but administration fees may be charged to patient (based on income and eligibility for free healthcare)
  8. 9-valent Gender-neutral (boys and girls) vaccination offered in schools (first year, second-level) since September 2019. Two-dose schedule. More information : www.hpv.ie
  9. LAIV is recommended in children aged 2-17 year-old. https://www.hse.ie/eng/health/immunisation/pubinfo/flu-vaccination/flu-vaccine-for-children/ https://www.hse.ie/eng/health/immunisation/hcpinfo/fluinfo/
  10. Flu vaccine is strongly recommended for pregnant women (vaccine can be given at any stage of pregnancy), adults and children aged 6 months and older with specific conditions. More information available at: https://www.hse.ie/eng/health/immunisation/pubinfo/flu-vaccination/flu-vaccine-for-people-with-long-term-conditions/


More information available at:
http://www.immunisation.ie/ http://www.hse.ie/eng/health/immunisation/hcpinfo/guidelines/


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Administration costs for the adult vaccines may have to be paid by recipient, especially if they are not covered by the medical card. (While having a card is usually income dependent, those with specific chronic medical condition may be entitled to free health care).

FUNDING OF THE VACCINATION PROGRAMME
- All the childhood/adolescent vaccines are free of charge (both for vaccine and administration costs)
- For vaccines recommended for adults, the vaccine is free but administration of vaccine may be charged to patient (which is based on income and eligibility for free health care)

MAJOR HISTORICAL CHANGES
1937: BCG first became available in the country

1930s: DT was introduced into national vaccination schedule

1949: BCG was introduced into national vaccination schedule

1952-1953: DTP was introduced into national vaccination schedule

1957: OPV was introduced into national vaccination schedule

1971: Rubella vaccine was introduced into national vaccination schedule for pre-pubertal girls (12-14 years of age)

1985: Measles vaccine was introduced into national vaccination schedule for children 15 months to 5 years of age

1988: The combined MMR vaccine was introduced into national vaccination schedule for children 15 months to 2 years of age and also for girls 10-14 years thereby replacing the rubella vaccine

1992: A second dose of MMR (MMR2) was recommended for all children at ages 10-14 years

1992: Hib was introduced into national vaccination schedule

1995: A measles and rubella vaccination campaign for primary school-age children was conducted for children aged 5 to 12 years

1999: The recommended age of MMR2 was lowered from 10-14 years to 4-5 years

2000: MenC was introduced into national vaccination schedule

2001: DTaP-Hib-IPV (pentavalent vaccine) was introduced into national vaccination schedule (IPV replaced OPV)

2002: The age of first MMR dose reduced to 12-15 months

2008: The age of first MMR dose reduced to 12 months

2008: From 1st September: Introduction of PCV7 into national vaccination schedule

2008: From 1st September: Introduction of Hepatitis B as the hexavalent vaccine (DTap - Hep B - Hib - IPV) replaced the pentavalent vaccine
(DTaP-Hib-IPV)

2008: From 1st September: Change in timing of MenC to be given at 13 months of age

2008: From 1st September: Change in timing of Hib vaccine (Hib) to be given at 13 months of age

2009: MMR catch-up campaign for students aged 15-18 years in response to large national mumps outbreak

2010: From May: HPV vaccination programme introduced for girls aged 12-13 years

2011: From September: HPV catch-up campaign for school going girls aged 18 years until end of 2013/2014
2011: From September: Introduction of Tdap adolescent booster (aged 12-13 years)

2012/2013: MMR catch-up campaign for all students (aged 12-18 years) in schools

2013/2014: MMR catch-up for students in primary school (aged 4-12 years) and first year of second level school (aged 12-13 years)

2013: From September: Tdap introduced for pregnant women between 27-36 weeks gestation

2014 (Aug): updated national guidance for HPV, MenC and Tdap routine vaccination. HPV starting as a 2-dose schedule from September 2014. MenC adolescent booster 1 dose schedule starting from September 2014. See latest expert committee guidance http://www.hse.ie/portal/eng/health/immunisation/hcpinfo/guidelines/immunisationguidelines.html for changes.

2015: MenC policy change. For a full description of meningococcal C national guidance that may affect policy and recommendations please refer to http://www.hse.ie/portal/eng/health/immunisation/hcpinfo/guidelines/immunisationguidelines.html. All children born on or after 1st July 2015 will be offered 2 doses of MenC for the primary programme at 4 months and 13 months and a booster dose of MenC in second level school (Age 12-13 years).

2016: Change of schedule for babies born ON or AFTER 1 October 2016. Meningococcal B and rotavirus vaccine added to the childhood immunisation schedule.

2020: LAIV recommended for children 2 to 17 years

2021: Flu recommended for adults 50 years and older

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Date of last update: 27 August 2022

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